A HISTORY OF PLYMOUTH ARGAUM RFC - 1887-1987      


ORIGINS

The name 'ARGAUM' is of Indian Origin. Sir Arthur Wellesley, before he became Duke of Wellington, fought a campaign against a very warlike race of horsemen, the Mahrattas, and finally defeated them at the battle of Argaum, a small town in Southern India on 29th November 1803.

Several streets in the area of Stoke and Devonport are named after battles and generals of this period (ie. Havelock, Outram, Aboukir, Acre); Argaum Villas was one such legacy and they gave its name to this club.

The original colours were light blue and dark blue equal hoops. This changed to red and white equal hoops in the period prior to 1930. Up until this time Plymouth Rugby Club had played in green, black and white unequal hoops and Devon Albion wore Cherry and White. At the amalgamation of these two clubs, the green, black and white was abandoned.

As Argaum was the only other club bearing the name of the city, these also being the city colours, they were adopted by the club and are in use to date.

Early in 1955 it was decided that Argaum needed a Club Badge. As the Club bore the name of the City, it was decided to use the format of the city badge, but to reverse the colours. To signify the Indian origin, we required some symbol of the sub-continent. Several suggestions were made, including the elephant, but it was decided that a tiger would be more appropriate.

The original tigers head was taken from the wartime shoulder flash of the South Eastern Command - Monty's in 1940-44.

To emphasise the Indian connection, some years ago the club was presented with a ships bell, inscribed with the legend H.M.S. ARGAUM. This bell now occupies a place of honour in the Bar.


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The Early Years